Docker Redhawk Swarm

To build upon the rapid deployment capabilities we introduced with Docker REDHAWK, we now bring you a distributed computing solution in the form of Docker Redhawk Swarm! Docker Swarm is the perfect companion to enable the greatest power of Redhawk: its capability to divide a complex signal processing task into components that can be distributed across a diverse set of devices. In this post, we walk you through the steps of setting up your Swarm, deploying Redhawk, and even integrating SDR and GPS platforms!

Extending CI with GitLab Runners

In the previous two posts, we covered first setting up SSL registration and automated maintenance using a Docker container from LinuxServer.io for Let’s Encrypt’s services, and then followed it up with enabling encrypted HTTPS and Container Repository on a GitLab server. So what’s next on the list for fully-functional Continuous Integration (CI)? Runners.

Configuring GitLab for SSL

As discussed in the previous guide, we used Let’s Encrypt to get legitimate SSL certificates for valid, external domains, and then mapped all of it internally to our own locally-hosted services via DNS. And of course, everything that needs to be maintained periodically is completely automated — a well-oiled machine.

Using Let’s Encrypt for SSL, Internally

If you’re unfamiliar, Let’s Encrypt allows you to register multiple domains and subdomains to get a valid SSL certificate (i.e., valid as in signed by a trusted third party Certificate Authority, CA) for encrypting your services. They also provide a utility for persistently maintaining the registration over time so that your certificates are always valid.